Weekly Recap: Jan 20

Weekly Recap: Jan 20

Here’s a recap of last week’s Civil War Podcast blog topics, and suggested readings for further study.


Post: Whipping Man
God’s Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War (Littlefield History of the Civil War Era)
Throughout the Civil War, soldiers and civilians on both sides of the conflict saw the hand of God in the terrible events of the day, but the standard narratives of the period pay scant attention to religion. Now, in God’s Almost Chosen Peoples, Lincoln Prize-winning historian George C. Rable offers a groundbreaking account of how Americans of all political and religious persuasions used faith to interpret the course of the war.

Post: Southern Jews & the Confederacy
Jews and the Civil War: A Reader
In Jews and the Civil War, Jonathan D. Sarna and Adam Mendelsohn assemble for the first time the foremost scholarship on Jews and the Civil War, little known even to specialists in the field. These accessible and far-ranging essays from top scholars are grouped into seven thematic sections—Jews and Slavery, Jews and Abolition, Rabbis and the March to War, Jewish Soldiers during the Civil War, The Home Front, Jews as a Class, and Aftermath—each with an introduction by the editors. Together they reappraise the impact of the war on Jews in the North and the South, offering a rich and fascinating portrait of the experience of Jewish soldiers and civilians from the home front to the battle front.

Post: Grant’s Anti-Jewish Order
The Jewish Confederates (NS)
Reveals the breadth of Jewish participation in the American Civil War on the Confederate side. Rosen describes the Jewish communities in the South and explains their reasons for supporting the South. He relates the experiences of officers, enlisted men, politicians, rabbis and doctors.

Post: That Obnoxious Order
When General Grant Expelled the Jews
A riveting account of General Ulysses S. Grant’s decision, in the middle of the Civil War, to order the expulsion of all Jews from the territory under his command, and the reverberations of that decision on Grant’s political career, on the nascent American Jewish community, and on the American political process.

Post: Lincoln’s Coffin
Bloody Times: The Funeral of Abraham Lincoln and the Manhunt for Jefferson Davis

Two weeks later, President Lincoln was assassinated, and the nation was convinced that Davis was involved in the conspiracy that led to the crime. Lincoln’s murder, autopsy,and White House funeral transfixed the nation. His final journey began when soldiers placed his corpse aboard a special train that would carry him home to Springfield,Illinois. Along the way, more than a millionAmericans looked upon their martyr’s face,and several million watched the funeral train roll by. It was the most magnificent funeral pageant in American history.

Post: Point of Honor
This show and To Appomattox sound suspect. Why not watch Ken Burns’ The Civil War or Band of Brothers instead?

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